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Bruce County Museum & Cultural Centre​

33 Victoria Street North (in the town of Saugeen Shores)
Southampton, ON Canada N0H 2L0

Toll Free: 1-866-318-8889 | Phone: 519-797-2080 | Fax 519-797-2191

museum@brucecounty.on.ca

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Bruce County Historic Newspaper Histories

The Southampton Beacon was founded in 1886 by William Graham, who also ran a printing business from the same location. Between 1893 and 1895 Graham sold the paper to T.H. Burns. The paper was then purchased by William J. Fluety in 1899 or 1900.  

Ernest E. Short eventually took over the newspaper in 1906 and changed the name to The Beacon. Ernest Short’s son, Everett H. Short, later worked with his father and was first listed as a publisher of the Southampton Beacon on July 11, 1929. Ernest Short edited the paper until his death on September 26, 1933. Everett Short continued to operate the paper until he sold it to Harold Wyonch in June 1973. 

At the time Harold Wyonch, was the owner of the Wiarton Echo and later owned Chesley Enterprise, Tara Leader, and Paisley Advocate. In 1974, Wyonch changed the name to The Beacon News and the newspaper was published at 28 Albert Street South and edited by Carole Wyonch. 

In 1974 Wyonch purchased The Port Elgin Times and in 1975, he amalgamated the two papers to form The Beacon Times.  

Carole Wyonch was the editor of The Beacon Times until May 1979 when Randy Derry Took over as editor, a position he held until November 1994. John Peevers was the Beacon Times editor throughout the rest of the 1990s. 

Sources:  

McLeod, Norman.  “The History of the County of Bruce 1907-1968”, vol 2, Bruce County Historical Society, 1969.  Print. 

Robertson, Norman.  “The History of the County of Bruce and of the minor municipalities therein.” Toronto: William Briggs, 1906. 

Short, Everett H. The Southampton Beacon, September 27, 1933. 

Short, Everett H. The Southampton Beacon, Vol. 22, May 30, 1973.

The Bruce Herald was founded by W.T. Cox February 23, 1861. Cox printed the newspaper on Durham Street, Walkerton, Ontario. In 1863, it was purchased by William Brown, who operated the paper until 1883. It was then purchased by partners William Wesley and Louis Kribs. In 1884, Wesley became the paper’s sole proprietor, eventually running the newspaper with his son John Arthur.  

John Arthur and William Wesley also owned the Bruce Times, a business they operated since September 1905. In 1912, they eventually amalgamated the Bruce Times and the Bruce Herald to form the Bruce and Herald Times with the first issue published on February 22, 1912.  

In 1928, the name was changed to the Walkerton Herald-Times.

The Bruce Times was founded by John Arthur and William Wesley, with its first issue published on September 28, 1905. In 1912, the paper was amalgamated with the Bruce Herald to form the Bruce Herald Times. 

In 1928, the name was changed to the Walkerton Herald-Times. 

Sources: 

Robertson, Norman.  “The History of the County of Bruce and of the minor municipalities therein.” Toronto:  William Briggs, 1906.  

Wilson, Mike ed. “The Walkerton Herald Times: celebrating 160 years”. Walkerton Herald-Times, December 30, 2021. 

The Chesley Enterprise was founded by Robert Henry Spedding in 1876. After Spedding, the paper was owned and published by several individuals including J. B. Stephens, William McKay, A. W. Robb, and in 1891, partners John Adolph & William McDonald. The Adolph & McDonald partnership dissolved in 1893, and Adolph started The Free Press which was in business until about 1898. McDonald continued as sole proprietor and editor of the Enterprise until his death in March 1939.  

By 1906 circulation of The Chesley Enterprise doubled to 1,500 since the Enterprise’s beginning. 

Clayton Schaus purchased the paper from William MacDonald’s son John C. McDonald in February 1940. He became the paper’s publisher and editor, a role he held until 1968. Schaus’ brother, Arthur, also worked as the shop foreman from 1928 to 1971. In 1968, the paper was then sold to William R. “Bill” Matheson, former Chesley councilor, mayor, and County reeve.  

In 1979, a rival paper named The Chesley Overview was formed. It was edited by Pat Halpin, former editor of The Chesley Enterprise. 

In March 1981, Bill Matheson sold The Chesley Enterprise, as well as The Paisley Advocate, and Tara Leader to the Wiarton Echo Publishing Limited, owned by Harold Wynoch.  

The Chesley Enterprise ceased publication on January 5, 2005, after more than 6,600 issues. At that time, the publisher and general manager was listed as Marie David, with Mary Golem as editor; the paper was part of Osprey Media Group Inc.  When the paper ceased publication, it was combined with the Hanover Post, Durham Chronicle, and Saugeen This Week to create The Post, a weekly newspaper published every Friday. 

Sources:    

Chesley Centennial Committee.  “Chesley … Past & Present 1880-1980.”  Chesley:  Chesley Centennial Committee, 1980.  Print. 

Golem, Mary ed. The Chesley Enterprise, Vol. 28, January 5, 2005.   

Matheson, William R. ed. The Chesley Enterprise, Vol. 129, January 14, 1981. 

Robertson, Norman.  “The History of the County of Bruce and of the minor municipalities therein.” Toronto:  William Briggs, 1906.

The first and only issue of “The Glamis Maple Leaf” was published on June 11, 1900. It was edited by Frank Howard Leslie, a Glamis teacher who began his journalism career writing articles about Glamis for other local papers. Leslie left Glamis and purchased the Tavistock Gazette. In 1904, Frank Leslie became the proprietor and publisher of the Niagara Falls Evening Review a position he held for the remainder of his career. 

Sources: 

Glamis Historical Researchers. Glammis Then and Now, John Kaminiski, ed., Glamis Historical Researchers, 2014. 

Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/245578725/frank_howard-leslie: accessed April 12, 2024), memorial page for Frank Howard Leslie (4 Jun 1876–7 Mar 1969), Find a Grave Memorial ID 245578725, citing Fairview Cemetery, Niagara Falls, Niagara Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada; Maintained by LisaGSM (contributor 48637172). 

The Informer “Serving Tiverton and Vicinity” was a grassroots venture started by Roger J. Paquin and Randy B. Roppel in 1977. The paper was published every two weeks until its final issue dated January 30, 1979. The editors cited low readership and lack of resources in their final issue.   

Sources:  

“The Informer” 1977-1979. 

The first newspaper in Kincardine, the Western Canadian Commonwealth, was printed on August 4, 1857 and edited by John McLay.  The paper included news from Bruce County, Canada, the United States, England and Ireland.  It was sold in 1870 to Joseph and renamed the Bruce Review.  On October 29, 1870 the newspaper was badly damaged by fire and was later sold to C. Cliffe.  

A number of changes of ownership and name took place over the years. T.C. Bartholemew purchased the paper in the mid-1870s and sold it only a few years later to the Mortimer Brothers. Under the ownership of the Mortimer’s the name changed to the Kincardine Standard. The paper was sold once again to Andrew Denholm on March 1, 1882, who operated it for four years before selling it back to Joseph Lang who changed its name back to the Bruce Review.    

Brothers Charles and Hugh Clark eventually purchased the Review in 1891.  By 1892, the name was The Kincardine Review.  Charles sold his portion of the business to his brother Hugh and moved west where he founded the High River Times.   

Kincardine became “a two newspaper town” on December 7, 1866 when Albert Andrews established The Bruce Reporter / a.k.a. The Reporter.  In 1925, it became evident that having two competing newspapers in town was unprofitable for both owners.  

The decision to dissolve one paper was decided by the flip of a coin. J.J. Hunter won and Hugh Clark dissolved The Review. Starting sometime between May and August 1925 the paper’s name changed to The Kincardine Review-Reporter, under the ownership of J.J. Hunter.  

Sources:  

Howald, Eric, ed. “Kincardine : Glimpses of the Past.” Kincardine Publishing Company, 1980. Print. 

Reynolds, John, ed. “Kincardine 1848 – 1984.”  Kincardine:  Town of Kincardine, 1982.  Print.    

Robertson, Norman.  “The History of the County of Bruce and of the minor municipalities therein.” Toronto:  William Briggs, 1906.

On December 7, 1866 Albert Andrews established the Bruce Reporter.  The paper was later sold to Crabbe and Brownwell.  Crabbe eventually retired and Brownwell operated the paper until 1878. The paper was then sold to Walter M. Dack in 1879, who made the Bruce Reporter well known throughout the district during his time as a Liberal MPP for Centre Bruce from 1886 to 1894.  By 1888, the name had changed to The Reporter.  It was later sold to J.S. Gadd in 1901 and then to J.J. Hunter in 1905. 

In 1925, it became evident that having two competing newspapers in town (with The Kincardine Review) was unprofitable for both owners. The decision to dissolve one paper was decided by the flip of a coin. J.J. Hunter won and Hugh Clark dissolved The Kincardine Review.    

Starting sometime between May and August 1925, The Reporter changed its name to The Kincardine Review-Reporter, under the ownership of J.J. Hunter. The Review-Reporter carried on under J.J. Hunter until 1931 when he passed away.  His widow ran the paper until she sold it to Fred R. Davies of Kingston, son of William Rupert Davies.William Rupert Davies, president and editor of the Kingston Whig-Standard bought the paper for his son Fred.  Fred was said to have been “the black sheep of the family”, and it was surmised that William, a successful businessman and Senator, bought the paper for his son to get him out of Kingston. Under the ownership of Fred R. Davies the newspaper was not successful and during his time, burned all the archived newspapers, destroying much of Kincardine’s history. 

In 1927 Kincardine once again became “a two newspaper town” with the founding of the Kincardine News by Art C. Rogers Sr. During the time these two papers were running, they were “hot and heavy” into politics – the Review representing Liberal views; News supporting the Conservatives.    

  In 1937 the Kincardine News purchased The Kincardine Review-Reporter from Fred R. Davies who moved to Frontenac County.    

 Sources:  

Howald, Eric, ed. “Kincardine : Glimpses of the Past.” Kincardine Publishing Company, 1980. Print. 

Reynolds, John, ed. “Kincardine 1848 – 1984.”  Kincardine:  Town of Kincardine, 1982.  Print.    

Robertson, Norman.  “The History of the County of Bruce and of the minor municipalities therein.” Toronto:  William Briggs, 1906.

The Kincardine News was founded in 1927 by Art C. Rogers Sr.  This was a second newspaper for Kincardine, as The Kincardine Review-Reporter was also operating at that time.  During the time these two papers were running, they were “hot and heavy” into politics – the Review representing Liberal views; the News supporting the Conservatives.    

In 1937 the Kincardine News purchased The Kincardine Review-Reporter from Fred R. Davies who moved to Frontenac County.    

In 1925, Kincardine became a two-newspaper town once again with the establishment of the Kincardine Independent.   

Sources:

Howald, Eric, ed. “Kincardine : Glimpses of the Past.” Kincardine Publishing Company, 1980. Print. 

Reynolds, John, ed. “Kincardine 1848 – 1984.”  Kincardine:  Town of Kincardine, 1982.  Print. 

The Kincardine Independent was established on April 10, 1975 by former editor of the Kincardine News, Eric Howald. For the third time in Kincardine’s history, the town became “a two newspaper town”, with the preexisting Kincardine News as the Independent’s rival newspaper.The Independent started out with only two staff. Eric Howald was in charge of the paper’s advertising and his sister Nancy Howald (former Kincardine News reporter) responsible for the news and books. Shortly after, George Poynter was hired as the ad manager. 

The paper moved several times through the 1970s and 1980s including the second floor of the Kincardine Mini Mall in 1975, the former Legion Hall in 1977, and the Shewfelt building on Lambton Street in 1982. The Independent later moved to its permanent location at 840 Queen St in 1983, where it remains in operation as of 2022. 

Sources:  

Reynolds, John, ed. “Kincardine 1848 – 1984.”  Kincardine:  Town of Kincardine, 1982.  Print. 

The Lucknow Sentinel was founded in January 1874 by Misters Bowers and Hunt. The paper was then sold to David B. Boyd who operated until his early death on October 29, 1876. Boyd’s widow, Elizabeth Boyd, took over business and is listed at the Sentinel’s proprietor until the summer of 1879, when her second husband, James Bryan took over as editor. During this time the Sentinel was published in Somerville’s Block on Campbell Street in downtown Lucknow. 

In November 1906 the paper was purchased by William James Albert McGregor. The business was then sold to James L. Naylor who is first listed the paper’s proprietor in the June 17, 1908, issue. In January 1910 Alexander D. MacKenzie purchased the paper and was listed at the Sentinel’s editor and publisher with John Walter Wraith as the managing editor. 

In August 1911, Wraith became the sole publisher and editor. By November 1913 John W. Wraith formed a partnership with W.D. MacKenzie and published under the name Wraith & MacKenzie. The partnership lasted until October 1914 when Mackenzie once again became the paper’s sole proprietor and editor, a position he held until his death on December 13, 1931. 

After his death his widow, Dorothy M. MacKenzie, assumed the role of publisher, with Lorne Campbell Thompson as editor. Thompson first began working for MacKenzie in 1928, becoming the Sentinel’s publisher in January of 1941 and eventually purchasing the business in May the same year. In 1953 Thompson’s son, Donald, became a business partner and in 1955 the printing of the paper changed to the offset printing method.  

Campbell Thompson published and edited the paper until his death on September 4, 1964. Donald Thompson then became the Sentinel’s owner until the summer of 1977 when he sold it to Signal-Star Publishing of Goderich. Robert G. Shrier is listed as president and publisher, Sharon J. Dietz editor at that time. Editors of the Sentinel also include Alan Rivet, Rob Bundy, and Pat Livingston.  

By the early-2010s, the paper was owned by Sun Media Corporation with Marie David listed as publisher and Troy Patterson as editor. In or around 2015, the paper became a division of Postmedia. 

Sources: 

Lucknow Sentinel, 1875-2016. 

McLeod, Norman.  “The History of the County of Bruce 1907-1968”, vol 2, Bruce County Historical Society, 1969.  Print. 

Robertson, Norman.  “The History of the County of Bruce and of the minor municipalities therein.” Toronto:  William Briggs, 1906.

The Mildmay Gazette was started by William Green in 1893. The paper was first printed in Gorrie, Ontario, eventually moving the publication to Mildmay a few months later. Green sold the paper to James Johnston in 1898, who then passed it to his son John A. Johnston around 1900. In 1916, Johnston sold the paper George Setefer, only to purchase the paper back in 1918. In June 1943, Johnston sold the paper to Barry Wenger who later left the paper to his brother Robert Wenger. By 1956, the paper listed “Wenger Bros.” as publishers, and Robert Wenger as the editor. In 1957, the Mildmay Gazette was purchased by and incorporated with the Walkerton Herald-Times. 

 Sources: 

 McLeod, Norman.  “The History of the County of Bruce 1907-1968”, vol 2, Bruce County Historical Society, 1969.  Print.  

 Mildmay Gazette Newspaper Collection (1945-1949, 1956 and 1957), BCM&CC. 

 Wilson, Mike ed. “The Walkerton Herald Times: celebrating 160 years”. Walkerton Herald-Times, December 30, 2021.  

The first issue of the Paisley Advocate & General Advertiser was published on February 17, 1865 by Richard Goldie, former publisher of Bradford’s Chronicle, Guelph.  By the 1870s, the paper was known as The Paisley Advocate.   

The paper changed hands a number of times: 

  • In 1869 Goldie sold it to James M. Bishop. 
  • John A. Murdoch then purchased the paper in August 1872 and operated it for four years.  
  • The Advocate then passed to Edward Saunders who, only after a handful of days, sold it to M. A. Clark.  
  • In 1880, John Collie from The Huron Expositor purchased the business and employed printer James R. Atcheson, also from The Huron Expositor.  
  • James R. Atcheson became sole proprietor in 1881, eventually selling it to Ainsley Megraw on May 1, 1885.  
  • Megraw published the Advocate for approximately seven years before selling the business to Donald McKenzie in 1892.  
  • Donald McKenzie edited and published the paper until 1949.  
  • Donald’s son, A. Ross McKenzie took over the business working as the paper’s publisher and editor until September 1959.  
  • The paper then changed hands to Dan McKenzie’s other son, C. Bruce McKenzie (who previously worked for 25 years with the Owen Sound Sun-Times). The Paisley Advocate was published by the same McKenzie family for over eight decades. 
  • On November 1, 1973, William “Bill” Matheson purchased the Advocate from C. Bruce McKenzie.  
  • In March 1981, Bill Matheson then sold The Paisley Advocate, along with The Chesley Enterprise and the Tara Leader to the Wiarton Echo Publishing Limited owned by Harold Wynoch. 

When the Tara Leader ceased publication in November 1989, The Paisley Advocate became known as The Advocate-Leader, published by Harold Wynoch and edited by Kerry Kitchenham. At that time, The Advocate-Leader was one of the Wiarton Echo Publishing Ltd.’s group of community newspapers. 

It was published as The Advocate-Leader until December 12, 1990 when it assumed the name of “The Advocate” once again.  At that time, it was published by Saugeen Press, Southern Inc., and listed David F. Switzer, as publisher, and Christine Meingast as editor. 

The paper ceased publication in or around December 4, 1991 when The Beacon Times (Port Elgin) began publishing a “Paisley Advocate” page within its newspaper. 

In March 1999, David Samuels introduced a new free community newspaper publication to the area by publishing the first edition of “The Paisley Avocado” with an old English title font to mirror the original title.  It was printed in black and white on single letter size paper and edge stapled.  Initially, it was distributed through ad mail to Paisley residents and placed in a few stores, around 600 copies.  Samuels initially completed the work himself, but was shortly joined by Sue Guthrie of Huntsville who worked on it daily for free, and eventually edited it.  The paper was eventually printed on tabloid size paper, and delivery expended to other communities in the municipality of Arran-Elderslie.  In early 2001, Samuels transferred the Paisley Avocado to the Paisley Chamber of Commerce; that organization accessed a grant and hired Mandy Craddock as editor.   

Later, the Paisley Chamber of Commerce regained the Paisley Advocate name and, as of 2022, it continues to publish the Paisley Advocate, with the assistance of a team of volunteers, on a monthly basis.  Editors since 2005 have included Craig Budreau, Joyce Craddock, and Gail Fullerton. As of 2022, free papers are distributed to areas in and around Paisley, Dobbinton, Chesley and the Village of Cargill, and are available for pick up from businesses in Paisley, Tara, Chesley and Cargill.  

Sources: 

Paisley Centennial Book Committee.  “An Historic Album of Paisley.”  1974.  Print.  

Robertson, Norman.  “The History of the County of Bruce and of the minor municipalities therein.” Toronto:  William Briggs, 1906.  

Samuels, David.  Information provided with donation of Paisley Avocado issues, BCM&CC, A2021.011.001.

In March 1999, David Samuels introduced a new free community newspaper publication to the area bypublishing the first edition of “The Paisley Avocado” with an old English title font to mirror the original title.  It was printed in black and white on single letter size paper and edge stapled.  Initially, it was distributed through ad mail to Paisley residents and placed in a few stores, around 600 copies.  Samuels initially completed the work himself, but was shortly joined by Sue Guthrie of Huntsville who worked on it daily for free, and eventually edited it.  The paper was eventually printed on tabloid size paper, and delivery expended to other communities in the municipality of Arran-Elderslie.  In early 2001, Samuels transferred the Paisley Avocado to the Paisley Chamber of Commerce; that organization accessed a grant and hired Mandy Craddock as editor.   

Later, the Paisley Chamber of Commerce regained the Paisley Advocate name and, as of 2022, it continues to publish the Paisley Advocate, with the assistance of a team of volunteers, on a monthly basis.  Editors since 2005 have included Craig Budreau, Joyce Craddock, and Gail Fullerton. As of 2022, free papers are distributed to areas in and around Paisley, Dobbinton, Chesley and the Village of Cargill, and are available for pick up from businesses in Paisley, Tara, Chesley and Cargill. 

Sources:

The Paisley Avocado

Samuels, David.  Information provided with donation of Paisley Avocado issues, BCM&CC, A2021.011.001.

The Free Press was established in Port Elgin by H.J. Benner in 1868. In December 1877, Port Elgin became a two-newspaper town with the formation of The Busy Times by W.S. Johnston. In 1886, The Busy Times and The Free Press amalgamated to create The Port Elgin Times under the ownership of partners W.S. Johnston and A.H. Watson. 

In May 1888, Robert Munro purchased The Port Elgin Times and published it as a sole proprietor and briefly as a partnership Munro & MacKenzie. Edwin Roy Sayles then purchased the business in 1910 and served as the paper’s proprietor and editor for nine years until he sold it to Samuel Roy Wesley in 1919. Wesley, son of Walkerton Herald-Times proprietor WIlliam Wesley, is first listed as editor and proprietor of The Port Elgin Times on June 16, 1920. In the fall of 1933, Wesley became ill and Rev. D.A. Cowan, R.J. Pequegnat, and other individuals contributed to the paper during Wesley’s illness, continuing after his death which occurred on May 12, 1934. The paper was then sold to Stewart R. Moore who is first listed as the editor and proprietor on June 13, 1934. 

Additional editors and publishers of The Port Elgin Times include H.M. Ferguson, C.W. McDiarmid, H.W. McDiarmid, K.F. Pettis, and J.H. Stafford. 

In May 1955, the newspaper won the Printed Word Trophy, awarded to the best editorial page in Ontario. In September 1955, the paper also received the Malcolm McBeth Shield for the best editorial page in its class in Canada. 

In 1974 Harold Wynoch purchased The Port Elgin Times and a year later, he amalgamated the Southampton Beacon and The Port Elgin Times to form The Beacon Times. 

Carole Wynoch was the editor of The Beacon Times until May 1979, when Randy Derry Took over as editor, a position he held until November 1994. John Peevers was the Beacon Times editor throughout the rest of the 1990s. 

Sources:   

McLeod, Norman.  “The History of the County of Bruce 1907-1968”, vol 2, Bruce County Historical Society, 1969.  Print. 

Robertson, Norman.  “The History of the County of Bruce and of the minor municipalities therein.” Toronto: William Briggs, 1906. 

The Port Elgin Times

The Progress was founded in January 1910 by Otto Seim. The paper was printed in the same building as The Hepworth Journal (which was founded in the late 1870s) and served the residents of Hepworth, Shallow Lake, and the surrounding areas. In May 1915, William R. Kinch purchased the paper from Seim. Kinch was the paper’s editor until 1922, when he ended the publication and retired. 

Sources: 

Amabel Township Historical Society.  “Green Meadows & Golden Sands: the History of Amabel Township 1851-1982.”  Amabel Township Historical Society, 1984.  

Stewart, William.  “At the Crossroads:  A History of Hepworth with Anecdotes and Reminiscences.”  Allenford:  Wm. D. Stewart, 2003.  Print.

In 1889, Harry P Chapman bought a printing press and began printing a small paper called The Telephone. In 1892, Chapman began printing a weekly called The Enquirer, which he later called The Ripley Express. In 1894 or 1896, Chapman sold the paper to George Mooney who worked for Chapman since 1891. In 1900, Mooney moved the printing press to 76 Huron Street, Ripley. Mooney edited the newspaper for 35 years, later with the help of his children Cecil and Adelene. In 1924, Adelene Mooney took over the newspaper and in 1929, sold it to J.J. Hunter of The Kincardine Review-Reporter. 

The Ripley Express became amalgamated with The Kincardine News, possibly in 1937 when The Kincardine News purchased The Kincardine Review-Reporter and the Express was published as a feature within the weekly paper. Allan MacLay was the editor of The Ripley Express until his death in 1946. Gladys MacLay was then the editor for the next year. The Ripley Express continued to be featured in Kincardine News until at least the 1990s.  

Sources:  

Ripley Historical Group.  “Ripley, Huron’s Hub, 1875-1992.” Ripley:  Ripley Historical Group, 1994.  

Ripley-Huron Reunion Historical Committee.  “A History of Huron and its Hub – Ripley: Ripley-Huron Reunion Aug. 1-2-3-4, 1975.”  1975.  Print.  

Women’s Institute of Ripley.  “Ripley and Vicinity History:  History of Ripley, 1851-1963.”

The Tara Leader was first published on June 16, 1881 by W. J. Whitlock. In 1893 Whitlock sold the paper to Rev. Thomas Hall, who then sold the paper four years later to J. E. Hammond in October of 1897.  

In 1899, Heraldi A. Vandusen (d. 1933) purchased the paper from Hammond, expanded its pages from four to eight, and published the paper for over two decades before handing the business over to his son C. Roy Vandusen (d. August 21, 1950) in October 1927. C. Roy Vandusen had worked for his father since March 1908 and was responsible for reporting, advertising, and subscriptions.  

In 1944, Vandusen sold the Tara Leader to A.E. Scott and C.L. (Dick) Dentinger. Dentinger assumed the role of publisher and became the paper’s sole proprietor in May 1950. In November 1968, the paper was then sold to W. Kennedy and later to William “Bill” Matheson in 1973.In March 1981, Bill Matheson sold the Tara Leader, along with The Chesley Enterprise and the Paisley Advocate to the Wiarton Echo Publishing Limited, owned by Harold Wynoch. 

Kerry Kitchenham was editor in 1989 when the paper amalgamated with the Paisley Advocate to form The Advocate-Leader published the Wiarton Echo Publishing Limited, owned by Harold Wynoch, 

and edited by Kerry Kitchenham. In December 1990, the Paisley Advocate reverted back to its original name and Tara’s news was incorporated into The Chesley Enterprise.   

Sources: 

Matheson, William R. ed. The Chesley Enterprise, Vol. 129, January 14, 1981.   

McLeod, Norman.  “The History of the County of Bruce 1907-1968”, vol 2, Bruce County Historical Society, 1969.  Print.  

Miller, Bruce A.  “Tara Before 1981.”  Tara:  Bruce A. Miller, 1980.  Print.  

Robertson, Norman.  “The History of the County of Bruce and of the minor municipalities therein.” Toronto:  William Briggs, 1906.

The first issue of the Royal Dominion News Boy was published on November 8, 1867, by Thomas Fairbairn. He operated his press out of building located at 1 Brownlee Street. The Royal Dominion News Boy was printed every two weeks and contained public meeting reports and advertisements for local businesses. On January 14, 1874, Fairbairn changed the name to the The Teeswater News. 

 The paper was known as The Teeswater News and South Bruce Recorder for a period of time between at least 1899 and 1902.  

 In 1889, Fairbairn sold the paper to Alex Coldwell and editor A.G. Stewart, who published it from the McKenzie block at 23 Clinton Street South. In August 1899, Alex Butchart purchased the paper from Coldwell and Stewart, later selling it to Alexander D. McKenzie (1865-1931) in 1905. By 1912, Adam MacKay (1879-1932) is listed in the paper as the editor and publisher. By 1914, MacKay had transferred the paper to James Clow Little.  In June 1916 Mary L. Fairbairn (d. 1962) purchased the paper from Little and became the paper’s first woman publisher.  

 On August 17, 1919, George K. Brown (d. 1962) purchased the newspaper and ran the paper out a building on the corner of Clinton and James Street East. On August 15, 1929, Brown sold the paper to Vance Statia (d. 1950) who ran the business out of 7 Clinton Street N. In 1941, Statia later sold the paper to Albert “Alby” Worrall, who once worked for Statia. Worrall owned and printed the paper out of 12 Clinton Street S. until his retirement October 30, 1969.The same year Don Thompson, proprietor for the Lucknow Sentinel, purchased the Teeswater News from Worrall and moved the printing of the paper to printing plant Goderich. Though the makeup and printing of the paper was done out of town, a news office was established in the Town Hall. Dorothy MacKenzie managed this office during this time and wrote most of the content for the paper. The p

On October 16, 1975, Thompson sold the Teeswater News to Keith Roulston, owner of the Blyth Citizen. Three years later the paper was then sold to Eric Howald, who owned the Kincardine Independent. The printing of the paper was then moved to Durham.  

In the spring of 1986, Harry and Carol Helfenstein purchased the Teeswater news from Howald.  The paper first operated out of the Town Hall office and Helfenstein’s farm on Lot 2, Concession 2, Culross Township, and later moved to The Emporium (Thurtell Building). The business expanded to include Agri Business, Money matters, Deals on Wheels, School Days, and Senior Side publications as well as tourist guides and special supplements. 

  In the 1990s two additional papers were published including the Teeswater Independent operated by Jerry and Linda Collision from 1992 to 1994, and the Teeswater Observer published monthly by Gordon Ripley from 1999 to 2001. 

The Teeswater News eventually ceased publication and the last issue was published on September 30, 1998. The Teeswater News received a centennial plaque in 1967 during Canada’s centennial year. They were the only paper in Bruce County to receive one. 

Sources: 

Culross Historical Society.  “All Our Yesterdays, A History of Culross Township 1854-1984.”  Culross Historical Society, 1984.  Print.  

Teeswater Culross Historical Committee.  “All Our Yesterdays, Volume 2: A History of the Municipalities of Teeswater and Culross.”  Teeswater Culross Historical Committee, 2008.  Print.

The Bruce Herald was founded by W.T. Cox February 23, 1861. Cox printed the newspaper on Durham Street, Walkerton, Ontario. In 1863, it was purchased by William Brown, who operated the paper until 1883. It was then purchased by partners William Wesley and Louis Kribs. In 1884, Wesley became the paper’s sole proprietor, eventually running the newspaper with his son John Arthur.  

John Arthur and William Wesley also owned the Bruce Times, a business they operated since September 1905. In 1912, they eventually amalgamated the Bruce Times and the Bruce Herald to form the Bruce and Herald Times with the first issue published on February 22, 1912. In 1928, the name was changed to the Walkerton Herald-Times. 

In 1957, Walkerton Herald-Times purchased the Mildmay Gazette and amalgamated with the Herald-Times publication. 

 John Arthur Wesley retired in December 1984 and sold the paper to Goderich Signal Star Publishing Group. The paper was then purchased by Lorne Edy of J.W. Eedy Publishing, proprietor of several newspapers in neighbouring counties. In 1999, the Walkerton Herald-Times was purchased by Metroland Media, which was part of the Toronto Star. 

In 2019 the paper was then purchased by Midwestern Newspapers. 

Sources: 

Robertson, Norman.  “The History of the County of Bruce and of the minor municipalities therein.” Toronto:  William Briggs, 1906.  

Wilson, Mike ed. “The Walkerton Herald Times: celebrating 160 years”. Walkerton Herald-Times, December 30, 2021.

The Walkerton Telescope was founded in December 1869 by D.W. Ross. The paper was printed on Jackson Street until 1912 when it then moved to Durham Street. Editors and publishers for the newspaper also included Wallace Graham, Joseph Craig, D. C. Sullivan, T. H. Preston, J. B. Sheppard, A. Eby, J. B. Stephens, A. W. Robb, and Harry E. Pense.  

In 1934, Pense sold the paper to William Wesley who merged it with The Walkerton Herald-Times. 

Sources: 

Robertson, Norman.  “The History of the County of Bruce and of the minor municipalities therein.” Toronto:  William Briggs, 1906.  

Wilson, Mike ed. “The Walkerton Herald Times: celebrating 160 years”. Walkerton Herald-Times, December 30, 2021

The Watchman was founded in Tiverton, Ontario in 1874 by twenty prominent businessmen and citizens who invested approximately $400 each to purchase a printing press and start the business. James Mann was hired as the first manager and a short while later Alfred Robinson held that position. 

Around 1878, John Pollard took over Robinson’s role. During Pollard’s tenure The Watchman’s stakeholders sold their shares to him and business became a sole proprietorship. Pollard operated the paper until 1890. 

John J. Clarke bought the business from Pollard and owned the paper until his death in 1898. The paper was then edited and published by George or John S. Clarke until just after the turn of the century when it was sold to Charles Cameron a Bruce Township native.   

In October 1906 Cameron sold the paper to a Mr. Gadd who operated for a short time before selling it to Archie McDougall in 1907. Around 1909, A.N. McClure became the paper’s proprietor.  By 1911 the paper was owned by Harry E. Steincamp who edited and published The Watchman until his death in 1940.  For a period of time in 1912 and 1913 the paper’s name included the village name The Tiverton Watchman. 

Sources:  

McLeod, Norman.  “The History of the County of Bruce 1907-1968”, vol 2, Bruce County Historical Society, 1969.  Print.   

Robertson, Norman.  “The History of the County of Bruce and of the minor municipalities therein.” Toronto:  William Briggs, 1906.   

“The Tiverton Watchman.” The Informer, 12 October 1977. 

The Watchman, 1891-1918. 

The Wiarton Echo, the Bruce Peninsula’s first newspaper, was founded in July 1879 as a weekly serial by the publishing firm of George Bingham, Colin F. Campbell and Company, with Bingham as editor. It commenced as an independent newspaper, devoted to local news of interest mainly to the residents of the Peninsula. A couple of rivals Encore and Wiarton News competed for a couple of years in the early 1890s. 

On July 17, 1885, the Wiarton Echo went from the control of Colin F. Campbell to Solomon W. Cross to become for some period a Reform newspaper.  J.M.K. Anderson became editor and proprietor in January 1894 and later sold the business to A.C. Elliott in November of the same year. Cross later resumed proprietorship of the newspaper by 1896 or 1897, and eventually sold the paper to Alfred Logan, formerly of Pembroke in August 1903.  Logan controlled the paper until August 1923.   

In December 1893, a rival weekly newspaper, Wiarton Canadian was founded by Ainsley Megraw who acted as editor. He had previously been publisher of The Paisley Advocate. R.G. Scott later became the proprietor.  The editorial in the first issue of this paper reveals it as Conservative in political affiliation, Protestant and moderately protectionist.  

On October 25, 1911, the Wiarton Echo and the Wiarton Canadian amalgamated under the ownership of A. Logan changing its name to Wiarton Canadian Echo as of October 25, 1911, publishing the first issue with that name on November 1, 1911. Following amalgamation, the paper became politically neutral.  The paper was owned by a joint stock company with Alexander McNeill as president. 

After A. Logan’s departure in 1923, the Wiarton Canadian Echo was taken over by E.A. Duncan under the Wiarton Echo Publishing Company.  E.A. Duncan was listed as editor and publisher until December 11, 1936. His wife, Mabel Duncan, then edited and published the paper from December 17, 1936 to May 24, 1945. E.M. Duncan Edward Morrow “Ted” Duncan later operated the paper starting on May 31, 1945. 

The newspaper changed its name back to The Wiarton Echo on January 1, 1942.   

 Publishers and editors of The Wiarton Echo and Wiarton Canadian Echo included T. Atkinson, W. Newman, Anderson, and C.V. Limpert, Harold Wynoch, and Keith Gilbert.  

Following other changes of ownership, in or around 2015, The Wiarton Echo became a division of Postmedia Network Inc.  

Sources: 

Cooper, William H. (The Ontario Department of Public Records and Archives).  “Wiarton Echo, Wiarton Canadian”,  January 30, 1970, located at the beginning of The Wiarton Echo microfilm reel starting January 2, 1930, BCM&CC AX2016.046.031. 

Gatis, Sheila.  “Wiarton 1880-1980.”  Wiarton:  Wiarton Echo Publishing Ltd., 1980. Print